Schowalter, Barbara

Schowalter, Barbara

Female 1823 - 1900  (77 years)

Personal Information    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    Event Map    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Schowalter, Barbara  [1
    Born 14 Mar 1823  Weirhof, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Female 
    Died 11 May 1900  Halstead, Harvey, Kansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Person ID I4702  My Genealogy
    Last Modified 29 Jan 2018 

    Father Schowalter, Jacob,   b. 17 Apr 1788, Assenheim, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Mar 1853, Friedelsheim, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years) 
    Relationship Natural 
    Mother Kaegy, Elizabeth,   b. 18 Sep 1782, Bolanderhof, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Feb 1845, Weirhof, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years) 
    Relationship Natural 
    Married 29 Oct 1814 
    Family ID F1362  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Strom, Peter,   b. 7 Jun 1812, Bosweiler, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Aug 1854, Donnellson, Lee, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 42 years) 
    Children 
     1. Strom, Elisa or Elizabeth,   b. 5 Jul 1843, Schwaig, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Mar 1898, Halstead, Harvey, Kansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 54 years)  [Natural]
     2. Strom, Barbara R,   b. 21 Aug 1844, Schwaig, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Jun 1875, Summerfield, St Clair, Illinois, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 30 years)  [Natural]
     3. Strom, Katherine R,   b. 15 Sep 1845, Schwaig, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Aug 1918, Donnellson, Lee, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years)  [Natural]
     4. Strom, Maria Anna,   b. 25 Sep 1846, Schwaig, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Dec 1924, Blackwell, OK Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years)  [Natural]
     5. Strom, Anna,   b. 11 Nov 1847, Schwaig, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Mar 1848, Schwaig, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)  [Natural]
     6. Strom, Anna Marie,   b. 11 Aug 1849, Schwaig, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Feb 1884, Halstead, Harvey, Kansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 34 years)  [Natural]
    Last Modified 29 Jan 2018 
    Family ID F1819  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Kraemer, John,   b. 26 Sep 1822, Oberflorsheim, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Jul 1893, Halstead, Harvey, Kansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years) 
    Last Modified 29 Jan 2018 
    Family ID F1820  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 14 Mar 1823 - Weirhof, Germany Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 11 May 1900 - Halstead, Harvey, Kansas, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Notes 


    • Letter from Barbara Strohm née Schowalter from the Weierhof after crossing on the ship Mercury from the USA in 1953 [sic]
      Cleveland, Ohio, 9 June 1853
      (Letter arrived on July 11, 1853)
      Dear brother, brother-in-law, and sisters-in-law,

      The great grace of Jesus, the love of God, and the comforting fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with us all now and evermore. Amen.
      Now, dear loved ones, you probably know from Leisie's and Risser's letters how our trip to Le Havre went. But then our misery began. Our Eliese suddenly took sick in the evening. She began to vomit and had a burning fever, so we sent for the doctor first thing in the morning. But he didn't arrive until almost noon, because he had ridden into the city, and Madam Bauer couldn't refer us to anyone else; she said he was the first one in the city. When the doctor saw Eliese, he shook his head. He couldn't speak German. Madam Bauer acted as interpreter. She made every effort for the child's sake, and she wouldn't take anything from me in payment. She took care of everything herself. The child received a medication for vomiting, saltwater compresses on her head, had to drink raspberry juice mixed with saltwater, then she was given a powder. The vomiting should have stopped several hours earlier, but she kept on vomiting nothing but gall. She could no longer keep juice and water down - everything came right back up.

      We had just told the doctor that he should come back the next morning, which he did, and he found her somewhat better then. But again he prescribed something for vomiting and a mustard plaster to lay on her stomach, and we were to continue with the compresses on her head. The doctor's visits and the drugs cost us 11 francs. Now, dears, you can imagine how I felt the next day, the 28th, when we were supposed to board the ship, which we did, with such a sick child. Eliese's illness had affected me so that I also took sick in Le Havre, and then we boarded the ship. We had hardly been on the ship a half hour - it was still long before departure time - when I had to throw up. About two hours later, the ship departed, and by evening many people were seasick.

      Our father, Bawett, and Anna weren't the least bit seasick. Katherine and Marie were fine again after one good vomit. But then Eliese got seasick on top of everything and was very sick for 8 to 10 days. Then she got better, thank God. Unfortunately I was so sick when we were at sea and was so weak the first 14 days that it took two people to lead me to the sundeck, where I stayed all day, because I could enjoy the healthy air there. Then in the last 14 days, I caught what I am firmly convinced was brain fever, because I had already had this twice, so I recognized it. The pain usually began at about 6 o'clock in the morning and kept building until about 1 in the afternoon, then it would gradually subside again. The pain increased for 6 or 7 days and got almost unbearable. I could no longer feel anything on my head, and then the pain gradually diminished over the same number of days. Now I want to tell you what my meals were as long as we were on the ship. On the 8th day, David Risser brought me a little wine soup. That was the first thing I was able to enjoy. I was always thirsty but had no appetite for food and couldn't eat anything on the whole voyage but 5 or 6 spoonfuls of soup at the most and a little hard bread with cheese, but that was dark bread-that was the nicest.

      Rissers gave me something, and then we also had bakers near us who helped us out. They still had a lot left when we arrived in New York and it wasn't the least bit moldy. Zwieback I couldn't try, meat I couldn't even look at, and so forth.

      Now I want to tell you more about our sea life. We and Vochtens had merged our households. The three men-Vogt, Dettweiler, and Nicolaus-and Vogt's girl cooked, and everyone complained vehemently. The cooking was the only thing that everyone complained about. The kitchen was much too small for so many people, and there was no cooking hearth, so the smoke was almost suffocating. There was often fighting as well, but it was insignificant. We were very satisfied with our ship's crew, the captain, the two helmsmen, and especially the ship's carpenter were very reasonable, once they got to know their people. The sailors also gave us nothing to complain about. They were all very friendly and not coarse. From what I heard, there were 535 people on our ship, and none of them died except an 89-year-old woman. Other than seasickness, there were no illnesses, and no one gave birth. If anyone misbehaved, the captain had them tied up with cords on the sun deck until they were good again, but that happened only twice.
      We had no storms. Our crew and also several passengers who had made the trip several times-especially a family from Saarbrücken who was making the trip now for the third time-they could tell of storms where the good Lord kept his distance, and of all kinds of other misfortunes, so we owe the Lord a great debt of gratitude.

      We had very strong wind once with a thunderstorm, but in a few hours everything was over, and then there was one time at midnight. These two times were enough storm for us. The tied-down crates flew out of place just as if they had not been tied down, and the waves crashed in so that the whole ship trembled. So there were many scares, and also the upper piece of the center spar, about 10 to 12 feet, broke off and made such a racket that everyone was startled. But this too was soon put back in order. We also had several days of fog, and bells began to ring, so that everyone put their heads together and the word went around in the steerage: Fire! Fire! But this ringing was only a signal, so that if another ship came close, they would not collide. So there was a lot to be endured on such a lamentable trip, and there were many occasions for prayer. On such a trip, you certainly get to know the Lord if you don't know him well enough already. He certainly won't abandon us, if we don't abandon him.

      My dears, as you can well imagine, among so many people, you get to know the views of many of them. I often thought, How can the good Lord look on this way? Well, maybe he heard my prayer as well as those of many others. On the first day of Pentecost we also had a worship service on our ship. There was a certain Madame Sauerchuhl from Karlsruhe with us who had organized events in addition. She had brought all the chairs from the first-class staterooms up onto the sun deck, where very few passengers other than stateroom passengers were allowed - and never us. First, several verses were sung, and then my dear husband had to read the Pentecost prayer from our Sollenkofer prayer book. Then a few more verses were sung, and then someone else read a sermon. It was cold most of the time, so cold that you could hardly stand it on the sun dick, but just two days before Pentecost it was very warm.

      Our ship's carpenter told us that he had been making this trip for 5 years, but never without stormy weather and without fighting and quarreling, like this time. We too are heartily satisfied with our sea voyage, and we have much to thank the Lord for. And so, with God's help, we arrived in the harbor on the 32nd day at 10 o'clock in the morning.

      It was only 32 days, but the longing, the yearning, and the sight I cannot begin to describe to you. It was on May 30, and on June 1 we departed from New York. From there we had booked a trip to Cleveland, which cost 4 dollars and 75 cents per person, plus one dollar and 75 cents for each 100 pounds of excess baggage.

      We traveled the first three nights by railroad and the fourth, from Buffalo to here, on a steamer; thus we arrived safely in Cleveland on Sunday, June 5. Brother Daniel was not at home. He had gone to Buffalo Friday on business and then at the same time he was visiting the Pfrimmerhöfers, and he didn't return home until Tuesday. On Friday, June 10, we wanted to leave here again, but our plans were thwarted. On Thursday our Anna took very sick. She developed a terrible fever, head and body aches, and vomiting, so that today, Sunday, we still don't know what is going to happen.

      My brother's brother-in-law, Jacob Leisy, treated Anna. He is a general practitioner here in the city and takes his meals at my brother's home. He hasn't said yet what kind of illness it is.

      A lot of friends and acquaintances live here, but I haven't gone anywhere yet except to Burger Leisy's, where I liked it very much. If they can sell for a good price, they are also moving to Iowa. Their Anna was married a few weeks ago to a nice young man from Prussia who was already in Iowa. He liked it there very much. Also my brother and his family are thinking of moving to Iowa soon. So far, I like America very much, especially the beautiful wood houses. You don't have to build a stone one.

      We also had a German doctor on the ship who treated me and Eliese. I also like it very much here at our brother's house. They have three healthy, dear girls. We'll be sorry to leave. But they will soon follow us.

      Give my regards to the people of Weierhof and all my friends-I can't name them all. To any who asks about us, again, my regards.
      Today, on the 13th of this month, we departed by steamer at seven o'clock. Our Anna is somewhat better, if only it will last. I hope the good Lord will soon restore her to health. Now, farewell, and fond regards from all of us. Greetings to you and your sister from
      Bawett Strohm.

  • Sources 
    1. [S342] The Schowalter Book, Arb. A. Schowalter, Clarence C. Schowalter, Edgar P. Schowalter, (Name: 1963, with Supplementary Report;).
      1799